Skip to main content

How to Save $1 Million Right Now

In our challenging economic environment, state and local governments are likely to face increasing demand for services at the same time as tax receipts shrink from reduction in property values and transaction-generated revenue such as sales tax.

To succeed, government leaders must think outside the box, taking lessons from other governments and from the commercial sector. What does this mean in practical terms, and how can agencies continue to fulfill their missions in light of tight of shrinking budgets?


First, I think this is a time to reassess priorities and cut spending on projects that don't serve the core goals of your agency. Many state and local governments can find $1 million or more in information technology funding that can be saved. For instance:
  1. Use it or lose it. Computer hardware and software don't usually improve with age. If you bought something that has not been put in the hands of users in twelve months, you are not getting value from your technology upgrades. Buy hardware as late as possible to get the most bang for the buck. A deadline can really help IT professionals and vendors alike to focus.

  2. Skip a generation. While I'm loathe to recommend agencies to sit on the sidelines while technology marches on, you must be realistic about your upgrade schedule for hardware and software. If you're only now getting around to Office 2003 upgrades, you should skip that generation and head straight to Office 2007.

  3. You may already own it. Be sure to check on whether you already own software before you rush out and buy it. Take advantage of your volume licensing with vendors such as Microsoft and use what you already own. There are so many products covered under these agreements that you may overlook something and then purchase another product with the same features. Build a SharePoint portal to keep track of your volume licensing agreement.

  4. Stop waiting for the bus. When you have a failed project, you know it. Don't wait until you have spent the last budgeted penny when you are concerned a project is not leading to a delivery. A stop work order will get attention fast.
  5. Improve requirements. Nothing wastes money more quickly than projects running amok without strong requirements. Bad requirements doom projects to failure and invite vendors to overbid in order to compensate for weaknesses in the solicitation.
You can also explore new technologies and approaches, such as cloud computing and hosted services, to find additional ways to save. Reducing the number of projects you manage will not only save money but will keep focus on successful projects rather than throwing more money at failed initiatives.

Popular posts from this blog

Key Concepts for Microsoft Dynamics 365: Tenant, Instance, App and Solution

To understand Microsoft Dynamics 365 (formerly Dynamics CRM), you need to learn some new terms and concepts that may be a bit different from what you know from databases and solutions that are hosted on premises. This post introduces some of the key terms and how these concepts are important for planning your implementation. While Dynamics 365 is available on premises, it is most commonly deployed on the Microsoft cloud.  This blog post discusses only cloud implementations. Microsoft has multiple clouds such as commercial and government community clouds. We start with a Microsoft tenant .  A tenant is the account you create in the Microsoft Online Services environment (such as Office 365) when you sign up for a subscription. A tenant contains uniquely identified domains, users, security groups, and subscriptions.  Your tenant has a domain name of .onmicrosoft.com such as acme.onmicrosoft.com.  User accounts belong to a tenant, and subscriptions are assigned to user accoun

Replacing Microsoft InfoPath with Power Apps

Source:  https://powerapps.microsoft.com/en-us/infopath/ Microsoft has offered a number of forms automation products over the years, and the most long running was InfoPath which was released as part of Office 2003.  InfoPath is a powerful and flexible product that stores user data in XML while offering form features such as rules, data validation, scripting, and integration with SharePoint.  The popularity of SharePoint resulted in many organizations standardizing on InfoPath for forms, especially internal forms which are hosted on an intranet such as employee reviews, leave and payment requests, and human resources forms. Microsoft has discontinued InfoPath, with mainstream support ending July 13th, 2021, and extended support ending July 14th, 2026. Microsoft has named Power Apps as the successor to InfoPath .  Power Apps has much in common with InfoPath.  Both products include integration with SharePoint.  Both are geared toward the citizen developer and do not require advan

Power Apps Portal: The Successor to Microsoft Dynamics Portal

In case you have been reviewing Microsoft's new pricing for its Dynamics products which was released this month and have been unable to find Dynamics Portal, it has been rebranded as Power Apps Portal and shifted to the Power Apps side of the Microsoft product family. Rebranding the portal product underscores the importance of app scenarios involving external users such as customers and suppliers.  It also provides a simpler interface than Dynamics 365 for occasional users. The new portal pricing is based on the number of unique users who log into the portal each month (for authenticated users) and on the number of page views for anonymous users.  "A login provides an external authenticated user access to a single portal for up to 24 hours. Multiple logins during the 24-hour period count as 1 billable login. Internal users can be licensed either by the PowerApps per app or per users plans, or a qualifying Dynamics 365 subscription." Pricing starts at $200/mo