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FAV Plugin for Microsoft Dynamics CRM: Formula, Aggregation and Validation


InfoStrat has developed the FAV Plugin for use with Microsoft Dynamics CRM to support data validation, aggregate operations, and formula support without programming.  Many business applications for Dynamics CRM require complex business operations that are not supported in Dynamics CRM out of the box but can be implemented through plug-in configuration.

Typically, in a complex Dynamics CRM deployment, business rules, complex calculations and additional security measures are scattered across multiple layers.  Often all of the above are implemented in JavaScript code on various Dynamics CRM forms, in Plugins, and in other extensions such as external portals and data integration components. This proliferation of implementation decisions makes a solution extremely hard to maintain and modify, breaking the development agility inherent to Dynamics CRM. The FAV Plugin allows an implementer to concentrate these functions in a single location and implement all requirements declaratively.

Background

Microsoft Dynamics CRM includes a flexible SDK framework that allows developers to modify the standard behavior of the CRM platform.  One of the approaches to customization in Dynamics CRM is custom compiled code—a Plugin—that runs against events triggered by actions in Dynamics CRM. These Plugins can be run on the Dynamics CRM server either synchronously or asynchronously.

The Dynamics CRM framework is designed for extension: the metadata for core entities is exposed in the API for creation of custom entities. Due to this high degree of extensibility, Dynamics CRM development can address the business functions for a wide variety of organizations.

InfoStrat has developed the FAV Plugin for use with any Dynamics CRM instance, whether based in the 2011, 2013 or 2015 version, hosted on premise or online. The context for the FAV Plugin operation is driven entirely by configuration objects located in the FAV Plugin registration properties, enabling developers to use this FAV Plugin against many CRM instances with increasing economies of scale for each implementation. As a result, the FAV Plugin can be used to implement declaratively complex business rules and additional security measures.

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